Study with Me at Craft U

I have 2 courses that are now open for enrollment at CraftOnlineUniversity.com OR CraftU,

Both of my classes are now open for enrollment.

Both of my classes are now open for enrollment.

for short.  Here are links of you are interested:

Fused Raw-Edge Applique Portraits  is a 6-week course that begins March 7th, 2016.

AND

Thread Painted Portraits is an 8-week course that will begin April 18, 2016

Interested in BOTH courses?? Enter the coupon code THANKS25 when you purchase Thread-Painted Portraits and you will get $25 off the cost of that course.

 

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Fibonacci Sequence Strip Quilt

This week I want to share with you a quilt made by my friend, Jeanne Lounsbury.  She made a strip quilt for her son using the Fibonacci Sequence (1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8,…).  When she shared it with our local quilt group, I got really excited and thought others would appreciate it, too.  She used my favorite hues of blue with a pop of red.  Here is the link to the Fibonacci Sequence Strip Quilt video.

I’m currently in the middle of my 2-week winter vacation from school and am thoroughly enjoying the extra time to work in my studio.  Next week, I should be ready to share with you my latest piece.  Stay tuned.

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Golden Mean Calipers Part 2: Crop a Picture

This is my second video on how to use the Golden Mean Calipers.  This week I show you how use them to crop a photo around a focal point so that the outer dimensions are harmonious and the subjects in the composition are well placed. These calipers are available in my web store.  If you find these videos interesting or helpful, subscribe so that you get notified whenever I post a new one.  I’m trying to do this once a week until I run out of things to say—like that could ever happen.

Calipers video part 2

calipers 2

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Golden Mean Calipers Part 1: Establishing Borders

This is my first video about how to use Golden Mean Calipers.  Ever Wonder how wide to make your borders.  You can use this tool to find a width that is in harmony with the size of your blocks.  If you already know the finished width of the borders you need, use the calipers to determine the best way to divide that width into multiple borders and sashing.

I’m not done with the Value Finding Tool Kit.  Watch for more videos using a variety of design tools.  Subscribe to my YouTube Channel: Lea McComas Fiber Art to see them.

Here is the link to this week’s video:

Golden Mean Calipers Part 1: Establishing Borders

Use the calipers to determine the width of your borders

Use the calipers to determine the width of your borders

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Value Finding Part 2: Near & Far

I’ve just posted Value Video Part 2.  Watch this video to learn more about how to use my Value Finding Tool Kit when making pictorial quilts.  This week learn about using the concept of value when building a landscape composition.

Next week I’ll post my first video showing how to use the Golden Mean Calipers.  I hope you are enjoying watching the videos in place of a text blog.  It is certainly more fun for me to share my thoughts via video rather than text, at least for now.

I’m hoping to build a following on my YouTube channel, so if you like the videos, please subscribe to the channel and share it with others who might be interested.

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Using the Golden Mean Calipers


Golden Mean Calipers

Today, I want to share with you a tool that I’ve discovered called the Golden Mean Calipers..  I’ve also seen them labeled “Fibonacci Gauge.” can be a useful design tool in your artistic process. There are a variety of ways this particular tool can be used. Let me illustrate a few.

Finding the Sweet Spot Within Your Composition

A focal point is used to grab the viewer’s eye and engage the viewer in your artwork. Generally, it is best to avoid taking the viewer’s eye to the center, for when it arrives there, it will tend to stop and rest. Placing key elements off center will tend to prolong the viewer’s engagement with the composition. Use the calipers as shown below to determine the best placement of the focal point and other key elements of a composition. In portraits, eyes and mouths are important features for focal points.

Use calipers for cropping the sides of an image.

Use calipers for cropping the sides of an image.

focal point 1

Lay the calipers over a photo print, to determine the best way to crop it.

Focal Point Landscape

Use the calipers to determine the placement of a design element within a larger panel.

Taking Elements Off the Edge

Avoiding the middle also applies when taking lines or elements off the edge of a composition. See how the calipers can be used to determine the most visually pleasing locations for the placement of lines that will carry the viewer’s eye to the edge of a composition.edge 2edge 1

edge 3

Creating Borders with Harmony

This tool is also useful when adding borders to a traditional block quilt. One method is to start with the blocks themselves. Place the outer points of the calipers at the edges of the blocks. This will give you two new measurements that will be in harmony with the blocks. Use the larger measurement for the total width of the border. This area can further be divided by placing the outer points of the calipers on the edges of the border area. This will indicate pleasing widths for and inner and outer border. All measurements indicate finished sizes. Don’t forget to add seam allowances.

Measure the width of your block.

Measure the width of your block.

Create a single border matching the wider measurement of the calipers.

Create a single border matching the wider measurement of the calipers.

Create harmonious smaller borders.

Create harmonious smaller borders.

Divide the border area using the calipers.

Divide the border area using the calipers.

Sometimes, a specific finished size is necessary and this isn’t achieved in the process above. In this case, determine the desired total width of your outer borders, open the calipers to this desired width and then measure the distance between the points to determine the finished widths of an inner border and outer border.

Perfect Facial Proportions.

The Golden Ratio occurs naturally within faces and calipers are useful when creating portrait works, either when drawing the face, or problem solving when a face doesn’t look quite right. See the photos below for ways to check the proportions of the face, and placement of the features.

Placement of mouth between nose and chin

Placement of mouth between nose and chin

face 1

Bring of the nose in relation to forehead and chin.

Placement of eyes

Placement of eyes

If you are interested in learning more about facial proportions and portrait quilting, check out my book, Thread-Painted Portraits: Turn Your Photos into Fiber Art 

AND look for videos on my YouTube Channel Lea McComas Fiber Art.

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Value Finding Tools

I’m trying something new in my blog this week: a video.  This is my first attempt, and let’s just say, it was a learning process.  I’m thankful that I get to spend a large part of my day with teenagers who know all about this and are happy to advise their teacher.

Follow this link to learn about the tools I use to select fabrics.    Value Finding Tools Video

These tools are available in my web store if you want a set of your own.

Value Finding Tool Kit

Value Finding Tool Kit

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Travel is Good for Art

I’m pulling out the suitcase and getting ready for travel in the coming days. Please come and say “Hello.”

  • Next weekend, at the opening reception for “Interpretations: Celebrating 30 Years” at the Visions Art Museum in San Diego.
  • Oct. 28-Nov. 1 in Houston at the International Quilt Festival. Look for me in booth #2014. I’ll be sharing space with Mary Vaneecke of El Sol Quilting Studio.

jenny-leaI just spent two days in a pictorial quilt workshop. This time, I’m a student, not the teacher. Jenny Bowker has made her way from Australia to Colorado and shared her techniques and lots of hilarious stories from her travels.

Usually, I take workshops that cover techniques very different from my own and I do it to get out of my comfort zone. I have to say it was very rewarding to learn from someone who also makes realistic representational work, similar to my own.  Check out Jenny’s work.

Her technique for expanding the pictorial panel with traditional blocks is something I just might use in the near future. Her applique technique to make blocks that simulate ceramic tiles similar to those I loved in Turkey is also on my “Must Do” list.

In preparing for the workshop, I selected a photo of Palmyra, Syria that I took back in the 90’s, when I was teaching in Turkey. Coincidentally, she once lived in Syria and she recognized my photo right away. I was a nice connection. Also, for some time now, I’ve wanted to incorporate some of the designs from Turkish art in my quilts, and now I have some fresh ideas for how to do that.  Here is the panel that I completed of Palmyra. Check back in a few months to see what becomes of it.

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Out and About

It’s summer and  time to travel, enjoy, and relax; both for myself and my art.  As for me, I’ve been to the mountains, Estes Park, Colorado,  to be specific, at the entrance the Rocky Mountain National Park.  I had the privilege of speaking to the Estes Valley Quilt Guild and got to spend the evening with a delightful group of quilters. 

estes 1

IMG_1680 (2)

As for my artwork, it has traveled to Utah and is appearing in the International Quilt Invitational Exhibition at the Brigham City Museum of Art & History.  The exhibit run through July and August.  If you are in the area, it is worth a stop.  I’m honored to be in the company of such magnificent quilts.

Turkish Bread Boys

Turkish Bread Boys

Peruvian Girl with Llama

Peruvian Girl with Llama

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Life Imitates Art.

deck view

View from the deck

Often we think that our quilting is just a hobby, but I’m here this week to tell you that it is more than that.  It is rehearsal for life.

Just the other day, I kiss my husband goodbye and send him off to the airport, then step outside on the back deck to breathe some fresh air, absorb some vitamin D, and appreciate the storm clouds building over the mountains.  I’m glad to see it’s going to rain because it’s pretty hot right now.  My bare feet are getting scorched on the hot planks.

A storm brewing

A storm brewing

I turn to go back inside and find that the slider has locked behind me.  After checking the windows and finding them all closed tight, I give a “you hoo” to my neighbors, but no one is there to hear.  This deck sits a mere 10-12 feet off the ground with no steps to get there.  Also, the spot with the least distance between deck and ground happens to be the place where we have stored some extra landscaping rocks, and a bucket where we put bags of dog poop until the trash man comes.  A sense of panic would like to rise up inside of me, but NO.

I stop and think, “What would Quilter’s do?”

deck drop

No good place to fall.

The answer: I must save myself.  I need to take stock of available resources and get creative: see what is in the stash, and find new uses for available items. I find chair cushions and drop them over the side on the spot that I determine is the best place to land. Unfortunately, cushions bounce.  I manage to create a ring of cushions that will soften my landing as I fall over after hitting the ground.  I climbed over the rail and hung from the lowest plank until I lost my grip.  Apparently, I too, bounce when dropped from the deck.  With some minor scrapes, a nasty gash on the ankle and a modest amount of swelling, I am earthbound once again.

Limping up to the front yard brings the new realization that I am still locked out of my own home.  We had installed a new garage door opener the day before, but didn’t get around to programming the keypad. Damn procrastination!!

Once again, thinking like a quilter, I knew that sometimes you have to rip things apart and put them back together. I can’t give further details on how exactly to break into my house, except to say that, that particular option no longer exists.

I’m going back to my studio where there is nothing to break but a needle and thread.

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